Many people choose to smoke meats or vegetables using their gas or charcoal grill. If you're cooking small items, using a smoker box or an aluminum foil works really well. If you're serious about your smoking game and you're making slow-cooked food (like pulled pork or brisket), we recommend purchasing a smoker grill. Smoker grills have become affordable, and it’s easier than ever to to buy one for your backyard.

We wanted to compare smoker grills of all varieties (electric, propane, and charcoal). We looked at the areas that each grill had in common. We chose the best five smoker grills and ranked them based on Handle Length, Durability, Design, Cleanup, and Cell Content. Once we had scores for each category, we came up with an Overall Score.

Take a look at the table below to get an overview of each smoker grill we tested. A more detailed section dedicated to each smoker grill is available if you want more information. All you have to do is click on each smoker to read the full review.

Overall Smoker Grills Review Scores

Brand

Handle Length

Durability

Design

Cleanup

Cell content

Overall Score

Weber Charcoal Barbecue Smoker

Weber

5

5

5

5

5

5

Char Broil Offset BBQ Smoker Grill

Char Broil

3

5

4

4

4

4

Brinkmann Charcoal Smoker Grill

Brinkmann

4

4

4

4

4

4

Dyna Glo Offset BBQ Smoker

Dyna Glo

5

5

4

5

5

4.5

Masterbuilt Electric BBQ Smoker

Masterbuilt Electric

4

5

5

5

5

4.5

18-Inch Weber Charcoal Smoker

The Weber charcoal grill smoker is something of a classic in BBQing. The bullet shape is instantly recognizable for what it is. The reason it’s a classic, I’d say, is that it works, and works well. It’s simple to use, almost foolproof, and turns out great tasting smoked food. Temperature control is really easy, there are vents top and bottom, so you can control the flow of smoke relatively precisely.

A nice extra included with this charcoal grilling smoker is the storage cover. It’s saves looking round for one that fits, and is something other manufacturers should pay attention to.

This Product Is Ranked as the #1 Pitmaster’s Choice In The Smoker Grills Category

Char-Broil Offset Smoker

The offset part of this Char-Broil Smoker Grill refers to the firebox on the left hand side. This is where you put the fuel, the hot smoke then passes into the main chamber. The firebox can be used just like a regular grill, with direct heat from the burning wood or charcoal. This give you the ability to use two different cooking methods with the same piece of kit.

I would say the size and price of this Char Broil Barbecue Smoker smoker makes it ideal for anyone who hasn’t grilled or smoked before, but wants to give it a try. The investment is lower than with a larger unit, and if it turns out this method of cooking isn’t for you, there’s less to lose. It’s also ideal for a smaller family or occasional use.

Brinkmann Charcoal Smoker and Grill

It’s probably coincidence, but this Brinkmann charcoal BBQ smoker looks a bit like a certain robot from a major film franchise. Unfortunately it isn’t anywhere near as sophisticated. What we have here is basically a small cylinder with a fire at the bottom and some wire racks at the top, with a domed lid over that. Even the temperature gauge is of the ‘warm to hot’ variety.

I found controlling the temperature quite tricky, as there are no air vents, and the shape of the fire pan means the fire can smother itself with ash. I have seen people make their own modifications to improve the performance of this Barbecue charcoal smoker, but you might as well buy a better model than resort to such tactics.

Dyna Glo Offset Smoker Charcoal Grill

So, this Dyna Glo barbecue smoker is quite large, taking a total of 150lbs of food! That should be enough for most parties, bearing in mind that’s an ideal limit, and odd shaped or larger foods will reduce that somewhat. This is one of those smokers you can set up and just let it do it’s thing, as all good smokers should be. You’ll need to keep your eye on the temperature once in while, but there’s an actual thermometer on the door, not just a temperature gauge.

I only have a minor issue with this offset grill smoker, and that’s during assembly you really need to use a silicone sealant around some of the joints. It’s easy to get hold of, but it should come with the grill. Otherwise the smoke will leak and all those flavors will be lost.

Masterbuilt Electric Smoker Grill 

Looking like a small black refridgerator, the Masterbuilt BBQ smoker is a compact unit, but with a mid-range capacity. It’s easy enough to set up and get working, the control panel is intuitive to use, and after that it just sits there getting on with the job. There’s even a timer that shuts the unit off when it’s finished, so you don’t even have to remember to do that.

Secondly, and this is entirely personal, is this thing really a BBQ product? I think cooking with propane is pushing the boundaries, but electricity is just a step too far. Surely something you plug in and program like a microwave oven isn’t BBQing at all, but simply cooking.

Frequently Asked Questions

What Type of Smoker Grill is Best: Electric, Charcoal, or Propane?

    How Much Fuel do I Need for My Smoker?

How Do I Control the Temperature of the Smoker Grill?

Should I Cover My Smoker When it is Not in Use?